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I’M LEAVING NOW WHERE DO I LIVE

by Great Emu War Casualties

Truly international band The Great Emu War Casualties release a new EP in the wake of critical acclaim, radio play and success in the music press for their previous release earlier on this year.

On 16 November 2018 The Great Emu War Casualties release I’m Leaving Now Where Do I Live, which contains four of the band’s eccentric new songs with witty, quirky titles. Members write together by sending demos between Australia, the Netherlands and the UK and often play live together in all three of their home locations, including the famous Cavern in Liverpool.

I’m Leaving Now Where Do I Live was written in Rotterdam and Amsterdam and recorded in bedroom studios in Liverpool and Manchester earlier this year. Then it was mixed on a 3 months cruise ship and mastered back in Manchester. The EP’s 4 tracks are called: Gimme Gimme Shimmy Shimmy, Sad Seaweed People, The Adventures of Sheep Dude and Food Goose and Just Whatever.

The Emus’ previous releases, such as Hoodlum Uniform have been playlisted on various BBC radio shows including BBC Introducing, BBC Merseyside BBC Radio 6 Music. The band has received reviewed by dotcom music blogs including Hhhhappy and the UK’s highly selective Drowned In Sound with their review “‘Anthemic and hope-fuelled slice of intricately crafted, quirky rock filled with all sorts of musical acrobatics and lush vocal harmonies”.

With their name originating from an Austrlian military disaster from 1932, Australian radio has also taken to the Emus, with plays on TripleJ Australian Radio and SYN 90.7FM. Indie music blogs such as IndieCentralMusic.com and EvenTheStars.com who said: “Anthemic and hope-fuelled slice of intricately crafted, quirky rock filled with all sorts of musical acrobatics and lush vocal harmonies”, with the band featured for their Track of the Day.

John Clarkson writes for music blog PennyBlackMusic about the Emu’s previous release saying: “Musically also they have real muscle. Songs begin delicately and then glide upwards in a beautiful mass of shimmering guitars and pulsating keyboards. There is a wonderful moment on ‘Stir Fry and Sadness’ when the guitars surge to a sudden squalling height, before tumbling downwards in the song’s final moments.”

Frontman Joe Jackson, originally from Liverpool, describes the songwriting process and quirky song titles with: “What we’ve found is that it is much easier to write with honesty and sincerity when cloaking the whole thing in a little bit of a joke.”

The EP was recorded by keyboardist Elliot Scullion, who also provides guitar and vocals from the UK, with drummer Arthur Dherbermont from France and bassist Saskia Clapton is from Sydney Australia, with input from more members in far flung places.

As well as featuring on many private Spotify playlists, track Stir Fry and Sadness had over 1,000 streams as well as Uncle Uncool. Australia’s hhhhhappy.com featured the Great Emu War Casualties in their weekly playlist on Spotify.

PAPER PLANES Volume 1: TOO MUCH TOO SOON by Kicklighter

In 1978 while school friends were listening to KISS, Kicklighter’s Everett Young’s favourites were film composers John Williams and John Barry. He played the theme to Superman The Movie by ear and performed it at his elementary school with accompaniment from his classmates.

At 48 years of age, the double album Paper Planes had become the culmination of what his 40s had been about, which involved struggle.

In 2009, Everett had finished a Ph.D. in political psychology but didn’t land the academic job and personal validation he had hoped for. This usurped academic career path has left him with some unresolved emotions.

Everett watched his new newborn children grow for seven years and found parenthood to be a heart-wrenching struggle. In darker moments Everett says: “I often feel trying to be a parent and a partner have brought to the surface the very worst parts of me, or at least the parts I find the hardest to love`’.

Therefore, aged 41, Everett focused on his guitar playing and practiced properly and most of the guitar on his recordings are his playing and the songs were written on guitar.

This album of songs is the expression of Everett’s last few years, haunted by a voice that tells him he came up short of where he supposed to be. Therefore, motivated by that convertible Mini Cooper, Everett still feels like the 9 year old kid who listening to Williams and Barry’s film music. The legacy he would like to leave is beautiful instrumental music for people to discover.

In March 2018, Everett found himself listening to his 22 new songs and realizing the experiences, emotions, watching his children grow, the guitar and piano compositions and practice had all been thrown in and the songs deserve to be heard.

In a review posted on his website is a review of his music project called Kicklighter’s album The Fascinating Thinking Machine contains this quote from Everett saying this goal was to “create an album that literally could have been recorded in 1985, 1989, maybe 1991, and could have been one of the great records of its time, but was lost to time and only just now re-discovered in a vault somewhere.”

Therefore, Paper Planes: volume 1 Too Much Too Soon is the soundtrack to a found footage film about the last few year’s of a man’s life, as a parent, a musician who was not going to become an academic but instead was going to fulfill his life purpose and leave a legacy of beautiful music with more to follow. The album’s title track Paper Planes will appear on Volume 2.

 

 

 

 

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IT IS NOT FUN, IT’S NOT A HAT

by The Great Emu War Casualties

The Great Emu War Casualties are an alternative band based in Amsterdam, who have an international line up, comprising two surnames from music royalty: Jackson and Clapton.

It is Not Fun, it’s Not a Hat is one of 7 EPs recorded in lead vocals and guitarist Joe Jackson’s flat in Liverpool when he last visited the UK. Further releases are in the pipelines before an album.

Keyboardist Elliot Scullion also provides guitar and vocals and is also from the UK, playing alongside drummer Arthur Dherbermont from France and bassist Saskia Clapton is from Sydney Australia.

The four-piece took their band name from a 1932 military operation in Australia to manage the wildlife and a notice on a hat stand seen by Saskia Clapton when she was touring in Tokyo with her previous band quirkily inspired their EP name.

The Great Emu War Casualties have chosen the specialist album know how of Aardvark Records in Cornwall to distribute It is Not Fun, it’s Not a Hat and subsequent releases, which promise to be as eccentric and colourful as their song titles.

Their music is an atmospheric concerto of guitars and keyboards, which glide and gently flow through the songs, which celebrate the absurd and melancholic, such as “The Rip Off” which tells the story of someone struggling to adjust to the 21st Century. As with many successful songs, such as those by Fleetwood Mac, the other two tracks convey atmospheres that mark the end of relationships.

A recent review on music blog Penny Black Music in February 2018 has already declared that international band The Great Emu War Casualties are “Musically also they have real muscle.” Two more EPs will follow shortly, followed by an album.

A 2018 review of “It is Not Fun, it’s Not a Hat” by John Clarkson, here on Penny Black Music.

Plus a review on Manchester music blog Even The Stars, and others appearing since It Is Not Fun, It’s Not a Hat’s February release.

You can buy It is Not Fun, it’s Not a Hat on iTunes and Amazon as an EP or three singles.

Discover these Tracks at:

Amazon

Buy CD

THE FASCINATING THINKING MACHINE by Kicklighter

The Great Emu War Casualties are an alternative band based in Amsterdam, who have an international line up, comprising two surnames from music royalty: Jackson and Clapton.

It is Not Fun, it’s Not a Hat is one of 7 EPs recorded in lead vocals and guitarist Joe Jackson’s flat in Liverpool when he last visited the UK. Further releases are in the pipelines before an album.

Keyboardist Elliot Scullion also provides guitar and vocals and is also from the UK, playing alongside drummer Arthur Dherbermont from France and bassist Saskia Clapton is from Sydney Australia.

The four-piece took their band name from a 1932 military operation in Australia to manage the wildlife and a notice on a hat stand seen by Saskia Clapton when she was touring in Tokyo with her previous band quirkily inspired their EP name.

The Great Emu War Casualties have chosen the specialist album know how of Aardvark Records in Cornwall to distribute It is Not Fun, it’s Not a Hat and subsequent releases, which promise to be as eccentric and colourful as their song titles.

Their music is an atmospheric concerto of guitars and keyboards, which glide and gently flow through the songs, which celebrate the absurd and melancholic, such as “The Rip Off” which tells the story of someone struggling to adjust to the 21st Century. As with many successful songs, such as those by Fleetwood Mac, the other two tracks convey atmospheres that mark the end of relationships.

A recent review on music blog Penny Black Music in February 2018 has already declared that international band The Great Emu War Casualties are “Musically also they have real muscle.” Two more EPs will follow shortly, followed by an album.

A 2018 review of “It is Not Fun, it’s Not a Hat” by John Clarkson, here on Penny Black Music.

Plus a review on Manchester music blog Even The Stars, and others appearing since It Is Not Fun, It’s Not a Hat’s February release.

You can buy It is Not Fun, it’s Not a Hat on iTunes and Amazon as an EP or three singles.

Discover these Tracks at:

Reverbnation

 BODY DISCOVERY by Callel

“Young, talented revelations Callel are a four-piece with a refreshing urge to sound that bit different…Callel look to a super future.” – The Scotsman

The four members of the indie Rock – Britpop crossover band Callel grew up in the same area of Granton in Edinburgh; they went to the same school, played in the same football team, caught the same nits…but it wasn’t until years later that they got together as a band.

They soon found their feet on the live scene and supported Paolo Nutini, Rooney, Asobi Seksu, The Hip Parade, The Bluetones and The Holloways among others.

Their music has featured on BBC Radio 1, BBC Radio Scotland, Forth One, XFM, and 6 Music.